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NEWS:

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NOTICE: Andrew Higgins Drive is temporarily closed to vehicles and pedestrians between Camp Street and Magazine Street for the construction of a new Founders Plaza at The National WWII Museum. The Museum's main entrance for the duration of construction is at 945 Magazine Street.

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Memorial Day Commemoration

Monday, May 30

Memorial Day honors the men and women who preserved our freedom by giving all for their country. This Memorial Day, the Museum highlights the artifacts, images, and stories in our collection that honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice in one of the world's darkest hours.

Visit mymemorialday.org for the schedule of events and for more information.


NOTE: Closing May 30
Fighting For the Right To Fight: African American Experiences in WWII


Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in WWII chronicles the incredible stories of the thousands of African Americans who rushed to enlist at the start of the war, intent on serving the country that treated them as second-class citizens. The special exhibit discusses how hopes of equality inspired many to enlist, the discouraging reality of the segregated noncombat roles given to black recruits, and the continuing fight for "Double Victory" that laid the groundwork for the Civil Rights Movement.

Don't delay—plan your visit today to see this special exhibit before it closes May 30!

Plan your visit to the Museum today.

Visit our calendar for information on upcoming programs and events at The National WWII Museum in New Orleans or sign up for our email list to receive regular updates.

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FEATURED EVENTS:

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Memorial Day at the Museum
Monday, May 30
9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Memorial Day honors those who have given all for their country and for freedom. Join us for events that honor these brave men and women. Learn more.

 

Commemorating the 72nd Anniversary of D-Day
Monday, June 6
9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Each year, our D-Day commemoration celebrates the Museum's birthday, but also calls to mind the men who landed on the beaches in Normandy more than 70 years ago. Learn more.

 

Meet the Author
Tuesday, June 21
5:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Stephen Harding presents The Castaway's War: One Man's Battle against Imperial Japan
Learn more and RSVP.

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TAKE ACTION:

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WHAT'S ON:

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CONNECT:

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MUSEUM BLOG:

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What are you wearing? In 1940 the answer was likely some combination of cotton and wool–maybe silk and linen. Today there is a huge range of synthetic fibers used to make clothes. Spandex, lycra, dry-wick, polyester, acrylic–these fibers in today’s clothes all owe their existence to nylon. Just at the beginning of the Great Depression, […]

The post SciTech Tuesday: Nylon appeared first on The National WWII Museum Blog.

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This month we’ve received many special donations, including a welder’s mask used at Higgins Industries by welder Edna Marie Bougon Rushing. The mask was donated by her daughter Ina Rae Whitlow during a visit to the Museum. Edna is on the right in the center photo and far left in the photo on the right. Edna […]

The post Worker Wednesday: Edna Bougon Rushing appeared first on The National WWII Museum Blog.

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Home Front Friday is a regular series that highlights the can do spirit on the Home Front during World War II and illustrates how that spirit is still alive today! Yesterday was International Nurses Day, a very special day for us here at the Museum! Nurses are some of the most important people in our […]

The post Home Front Friday: Hello Nurse! appeared first on The National WWII Museum Blog.

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FEATURED ARTIFACT:

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1944 Rohwer Center High School Yearbook

At first glance, the pages of the 1944 Résumé yearbook make Rohwer Center High School seem like any other high school on the Home Front: rich with student life, activities, victory gardens, and dances. In reality, however, the experience of Rohwer Center students couldn't have been more different. The school, located at the Rohwer War Relocation Center in McGeehee, Arkansas, was created to educate the children of Japanese American descent who were forced from their homes along the West Coast of the United States and required to live behind barbed wire for the duration of World War II, far from the homes they knew. Located in remote areas of the country, these camps were modeled after military facilities with guard towers and tar-paper barracks as everyday features. Roughly 120,000 men, women, and children from 1942 – 1945 were held without trials, and nearly 70,000 of those evicted were American citizens. Ultimately, not a single Japanese American person was ever convicted of espionage or acts of sabotage against the United States.

Learn more about yearbooks from World War II.


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FOCUS ON:

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Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in WWII

Our newest exhibition, Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in WWII is a poignant retelling of the stories of the thousands of African Americans who rushed to enlist at the start of the war, intent on serving the country that treated them as second-class citizens. Open since July 4, the special exhibit discusses how hopes of equality inspired many to enlist, the discouraging reality of the segregated non-combat roles given to black recruits, and the continuing fight for "Double Victory" that laid the groundwork for the Civil Rights Movement.

View the microsite to learn more.

 

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