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NEWS:

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Commemorating the 70th Anniversary of V-J Day

Wednesday, September 2
10:30 a.m.– 12:00 p.m.
US Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Center

Though the fighting had ceased some three weeks earlier, September 2, 1945, was officially the day to celebrate the end of World War II. Crewmembers crowded the decks of the USS Missouri as the Japanese officially signed the formal surrender documents. The gruesome, exhausting, brutal war was officially over, three and a half years after the US was attacked at Pearl Harbor.

The Museum will commemorate this important WWII anniversary with speakers and archival footage reflecting on the meanings and legacies of Victory over Japan.

For more information, visit our calendar page.

Can't make it to the Museum? Watch the event live.

Plan your visit to the Museum today.

Visit our calendar for information on upcoming programs and events at The National WWII Museum in New Orleans or sign up for our email list to receive regular updates.

dividing bar Exhibits Plan a Visit Honor Roll Beyond All Boundaries Stage Door Canteen American Sector dividing bar

FEATURED EVENTS:

dividing bar Celebrating the End of the War Culture Collision 7 Meet the Author: 2015 Pulitzer Prize Winner David I. Kertzer, PhD, presents 'The Pope and Mussolini'

Commemorating the 70th Anniversary of V-J Day
Wednesday, September 2, 2015
10:30 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
The Museum will commemorate this important WWII anniversary with speakers who will recollect receiving the news, footage from 1945, and historians reflecting on the meanings and legacies of Victory in Japan. Learn more.

 

Culture Collision 7
Wednesday, September 2, 2015
5:30 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
The National WWII Museum is proud to host Culture Collision 7, a one-of-a-kind happy hour that brings together more than 60 of New Orleans's cultural organizations, at the US Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Center. Learn more.

 

Meet the Author: 2015 Pulitzer Prize Winner David I. Kertzer, PhD, presents "The Pope and Mussolini"
Thursday, September 17, 2015
5:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
Join us as David I. Kertzer, PhD, presents The Pope and Mussolini: The Secret History of Pius XI and the Rise of Fascism in Europe, the gripping story of Pope Pius XI's secret relations with Mussolini. Learn more and RSVP.

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TAKE ACTION:

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WHAT'S ON:

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August 30, 2015
Sunday Swing featuring the Victory 6
1:30 pm–4:30 pm
BB's Stage Door Canteen

September 2, 2015
Commemorating the 70th Anniversary of V-J Day
10:30 am–12:00 pm
US Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Center

September 2, 2015
White Glove Wednesdays
9:00 am–12:00 pm
Louisiana Memorial Pavilion

September 2, 2015
Culture Collision 7
5:30 pm–8:00 pm
US Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Center

September 9, 2015
White Glove Wednesdays
9:00 am – 12:00 pm
Louisiana Memorial Pavilion

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MUSEUM BLOG:

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As we continue down the Road to Tokyo, and through the China-Burman-India gallery,we stop at our final exhibit of the gallery which will detail the role of the United States Armed Air Forces and their critical assistance in securing Allied success in CBI.   Flying Tigers/Air Power This exhibit portrays the important role of the […]

The post ROAD TO TOKYO COUNTDOWN: EXHIBITS WITHIN CHINA-BURMA-INDIA appeared first on The National WWII Museum Blog.

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On June 24, an honor flight of 50 WWII veterans arrived in New Orleans to a hero’s welcome, kicking off three red carpet days in New Orleans. Along with the trip’s sponsor, Gary Sinise, the veterans were greeted with jazz music, Mardi Gras beads, and throngs of cheering supporters including members of the Armed Forces […]

The post Soaring Valor: Gary Sinise Foundation and The National WWII Museum Partner to Honor the Greatest Generation appeared first on The National WWII Museum Blog.

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Louisiana National Guard Staff Sergeant Patrick Stephen already was fond of The National WWII Museum on Andrew Higgins Boulevard, having visited repeatedly, when Hurricane Katrina struck the city a decade ago, ushering in a time of misery and chaos. That sentiment – an appreciation for the Museum’s mission – surfaced in a forceful way a […]

The post Museum’s Post-Katrina Defender Now Advancing Its Mission appeared first on The National WWII Museum Blog.

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FEATURED ARTIFACT:

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1944 Topeka High School Sunflower Yearbook

The motivation for many African Americans fighting for their right to fight in World War II was the hope that, by displaying determination and bravery on the battlefield, conditions might improve for black civilians on the Home Front. In the 1940s, conditions varied for African Americans depending on their geographic locale, occupation, and gender. Across the United States, racial segregation in schools and in the workforce was upheld by law. The discriminatory policy of "separate but equal" manifested itself in many different ways; some brutally apparent, others more subtle. The latter approach to racial segregation can be seen in the pages of the 1944 Sunflower yearbook of Topeka High School in Topeka, Kansas. In the early pages of the Sunflower, we are greeted by the familiar sight of prom royalty; however, only a few pages later we see a second set of prom kings and queens: separate prom courts, one white and one black. Despite being academically integrated since its founding, all sports, clubs, and extra-curricular activities at Topeka High School during World War II were strictly segregated by race.

View the yearbook in the Museum's online collection, See You Next Year: High School Yearbooks from WWII, to find out more.


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FOCUS ON:

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Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in WWII

Our newest exhibition, Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in WWII is a poignant retelling of the stories of the thousands of African Americans who rushed to enlist at the start of the war, intent on serving the country that treated them as second-class citizens. Open since July 4, the special exhibit discusses how hopes of equality inspired many to enlist, the discouraging reality of the segregated non-combat roles given to black recruits, and the continuing fight for "Double Victory" that laid the groundwork for the Civil Rights Movement.

View the microsite to learn more.

 

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